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英文誌(2004-)

Journal of Medical Ultrasonics

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1993 - Vol.20

Vol.20 No.01

Original Article(原著)

(0030 - 0038)

Bモードエコー法の画質と超音波パルス伝搬時間に関する基礎的研究

Basic Investigation of the Relationship between the Quality of B-mode Image and the Propagation Time of the Pulse Experienced in Examination of the Human Abdominal Wall Specimens

住野 洋一1, 神田 良一2, 高見沢 欣也2, 佐々木 博2, C. Waag Robert3

Yoichi SUMINO1, Ryoichi KANDA2, Kinya TAKAMIZAWA2, Hiroshi SASAKI2, Robert C. WAAG3

1(秩)東芝・那須工場・超音波技術部, 2(秩)東芝・那須工場・医用機器技術研究所, 3Departments of Electrical Engineering and Radiology, University of Rochester

1Ultrasound Systems Engineering Department, Toshiba Corporation, 2Medical Engineering Lab., Toshiba Corporation, 3Departments of Electrical Engineering and Radiology, University of Rochester

キーワード : Wavefront Distortion, Human Abdominal Wall, 2D Measurement, Degradation in Focusing, Image Quality

Time delay differences have been measured for propagation through water and through the abdominal wall of five patients. The experiment employed a curved transducer to produce a hemispherical wave pulse and a linear array to measure the resulting field along a line in a plane. Translation of the array in the direction of elevation yielded data over a two-dimensional aperture. The time delay across the aperture was calculated by adding the delay differences obtained by cross-correlating signals on adjacent elements and noting the position of the peaks. Waveform plots and the time delay difference plots together with resulting histograms and statistical data were evaluated for propagation through water and through five human abdominal walls. The results indicate that arrival time fluctuations in the presence of human abdominal wall specimens are significantly greater than those for water. Calculations of beam patterns using simulated random arrival time fluctuations also indicate that images through human abdominal walls will be out of focus in systems that operate at a frequency of approximately 3 MHz.